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Design, Internet and Marketing hints,

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So your not quite sure what "SMTP", "HTML" or "Vector EPS files" are or mean? Then this section should be of great help. We've put together a list with as many industry terms and acronyms as we could think of. So think of a word and just use the A to Z navigation key below.

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This tutorial shows you how to set up Microsoft Outlook 2003 to work with your e-mail account. This tutorial focuses on setting up Microsoft Outlook 2003, but these settings are similar in other versions of Microsoft Outlook. You can set up previous versions of Microsoft Outlook by using the settings in this tutorial.

 

Please ensure that you know the following information before you start this process:

  • Your email address, user name (this is usually the full email address) and email password.
  • The details of your incoming mail server (POP3) or (IMAP) mail server. POP3 example: pop.example.co.uk or (IMAP) example: imap.example.co.uk.
  • Your SMTP details (outgoing mail server - connection to the actual internet). Address example: smtp.fasthosts.co.uk, password and username provided to you by your ISP (Internet Service Provider or Communique if requested).

 

If you just installed Outlook, or have never setup an email account in it before, Outlook will offer you to setup an email account as soon as it opens. If nothing happens, or if you already have email accounts setup in Outlook, simply initiate the email account setup process by:

 

Step 1: Going to Tools > E-mail Accounts, and the new email account wizard will pop up.

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Step 2: On the E-mail Accounts wizard window, select Add a new e-mail account, and then click Next.

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Step 3: In the Server Type step of Outlook's Startup wizard, you are given the choice between five different types of email accounts. You'll probably choose (POP3) or (IMAP).

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Explanations to each:

  • Microsoft Exchange Server - Exchange is Microsoft's mail server software. If you are using Outlook 2003 on a corporate network, check with your System Administrator / IT Department - Outlook may or not use Exchange.
  • POP3 - POP3 is an email protocol, the most widely used for Internet mail. Your email provider most probably uses POP3. In doubt, check with your email provider or Internet Service Provider (ISP), or try setting up Outlook 2003 with POP3.
  • IMAP - Like POP3, IMAP is an Internet mail protocol. Most email providers do not support IMAP, some only offer it. Please check with your email provider.
  • HTTP - In our case Outlook 2003 means Hotmail or MSN by "HTTP"; if you are not trying to setup an email account with an Hotmail or MSN email address, you should probably use POP3. Hotmail and MSN are Microsoft's webmail (Internet mail) services, which are meant to integrate with Outlook 2003 or earlier, and Outlook Express.
  • Additional Server Types - Additional Server Types allow you to pick a custom mail server, (like a groupware server or even to send faxes from Outlook 2003).

 

In our case, we will setup a POP3 email account in Outlook, using the most common configuration settings.

(The procedure to setup an IMAP email account in Outlook 2003 is basically the same, and Microsoft Outlook support both email account types. Use the information provided by your email host.)

Select POP3; click Next to continue the email account setup.

 

Step 4: This screen is the most important in the email account setup: in the Outlook wizard's Internet E-mail Settings screen, you will enter all the information Outlook needs to interact (or "talk") with the mail server.

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On the Internet E-mail Settings (POP3/IMAP) window, enter your information as follows:

  • Your Name: Your first and last name.
  • E-mail Address: Your email address.
  • User Name: Usually your email address, again.
  • Password: Your email account password.
  • Incoming mail server (POP3) Example: pop.example.co.uk or (IMAP), imap.example.co.uk.
  • Outgoing mail server (SMTP) Example: smtp.fasthosts.co.uk.

Next click More Settings...

IMPORTANT NOTE: smtp.fasthosts.co.uk is the smtp address Communique can setup as part of our hosting package, which allows you to connect and receive emails no matter where you are, as long as you have an internet connection. If you are interested in this service please call or email us for details. If you don't have a hosting package from ourselves, or you use a different Internet Service Provider (ISP) to connect to the Internet, then your outgoing mail server (SMTP) will have been provided by them, it will usually start with "smtp.". Contact your Internet Service Provider to get these settings if you don't already know them.

Step 5: On the Internet E-mail Settings window, go to the Outgoing Server tab.

Select My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication.

Then select Log on using and enter your SMTP User Name and Password, then click OK. (These are the SMTP details that will have been provided to you by your ISP or Communique.)

If you haven't already click OK.

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Step 6: You will return back to the previous screen. Now you can just run a quick test of your new settings.

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After you have entered all your email account's information, Outlook can let you test the validity of these settings with the Test Account Settings button. Clicking it generate a test email from yourself to yourself; if successful, the test confirms this visually on screen.

If it highlights an error, click the Error tab to troubleshoot email account setup problems. Check those particular detail to make sure you have input them correctly before any other form of action. Oh, and the obvious one... are you actually connected to the internet? Just checking.

If all is well, then click Next.

 

Final Step 7: You have completed your setup. Click Finish.

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NOTE: As a courtesy, we provide information about how to use certain third-party products, but we do not endorse or directly support third-party products and we are not responsible for the functions or reliability of such products.

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This tutorial shows you how to set up Apple Mail (OS X) to work with your e-mail account. This tutorial focuses on setting up Apple Mail (OS X), but the settings used will help you set your email up in their mail software.

 

Please ensure that you know the following information before you start this process:

  • Your email address, user name (this is usually the full email address) and email password.
  • The details of your incoming mail server (POP3) or (IMAP) mail server. POP3 example: pop.example.co.uk or (IMAP) example: imap.example.co.uk.
  • Your SMTP details (outgoing mail server - connection to the actual internet). Address example: smtp.fasthosts.co.uk, password and username provided to you by your ISP (Internet Service Provider or Communique if requested).

 

If you just started up Apple Mail for the first time, or have never setup an email account in it before, Apple Mail will ask you to setup an email account as soon as it opens. If nothing happens, or if you already have email accounts setup in Apple Mail, simply initiate the email account setup process by:

Step 1: Start the Mail application on your Mac, then select the Mail menu for the application, then select Preferences…

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Step 2: Select the Accounts tab. Then click the plus icon ( + ) in the bottom left to add a new POP or IMAP account.

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Step 3: Fill out the new fields as follows:

  • Full Name: Your first and last name.
  • E-mail Address: Your email address.
  • Password: Your email account password.

Once complete, click Continue.

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Step 4: For your Incoming Mail Server, fill out the fields as follows:

  • Account Type: POP or IMAP are the most likely.
  • Description: Choose a descriptive name of your choice.
  • Incoming Mail Server (POP3 or IMAP): pop.example.co.uk.
  • User Name: Usually your email address, again.
  • Password: Your email account password.

Once complete, click Continue.

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Step 5: Click the Authentication Field and select: Password, then click Continue.

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Step 6: For your SMTP Outgoing Mail Server, fill out the fields as follows:

  • Description: Choose a descriptive name of your choice.
  • Outgoing Mail Server : smtp.example.co.uk.
  • User Name: Your SMTP Username.
  • Password: Your SMTP Password. (These are the SMTP details that will have been provided to you by your ISP or Communique.)

Once complete, click Continue.

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Step 7: Click the Authentication Field and select: Password, then click Continue.

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Step 8: This is an overview of the settings you have entered. If you are happy then click Create.

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Final Step 9: Now navigate to Mailbox, then select Get All New Mail to force your software to make a first check for any new mail. Any errors at this point would require you to go back and check the information that you have entered... in particular the usernames and passwords before making any calls.

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NOTE: As a courtesy, we provide information about how to use certain third-party products, but we do not endorse or directly support third-party products and we are not responsible for the functions or reliability of such products.

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Yes, Internet Explorer isn't the only browser! And it's not even close to being the best! This short list should help you make the right choice regarding which browser you should be using on your computer(s).

 

The Top 5 Browsers in no particular order:

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Chrome
(Available free for Windows/Mac/Linux):

Chrome is the new kid on the block. Although Chrome is a cousin to the Safari web browser - both share the speedy WebKit rendering engine - Goggle's browser is less than a year old. Despite its youth, it's already garnered praise for its minimalist interface and snappy page rendering. Chrome also handles site errors and quirks well, and each individual tab is a unique process, so a crash or lag in one shouldn't pull down or crash the others. In general, though, Chrome has caught attention for running a performance-focused JavaScript engine in a lightweight GUI. Also worth noting, Chrome has been holding its own in the recent Pwn2Own security challenge, with the distinction of being the only browser left standing after the first day of security exploits and attacks. [Download Chrome]

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Firefox
(Available free for Windows/Mac/Linux):

Firefox is the grandchild of the venerable Mosaic browser and free-roaming son of Netscape. Although Firefox has a myriad of user-friendly, forward-thinking features, a decently secure framework, and an open-source ideology, its most prominent is extensibility. When convincing a Firefox user to abandon Firefox for anything else, even temporarily, you won't have to fight them over giving up the AwesomeBar or about:config tweaks - you'll hear a common, understandable refrain: "What about my extensions?" The repository of extensions maintained by Mozilla currently has over 6,000 entries, covering everything from blocking advertisements, to managing your clipboard, to allowing you to further customise your browsing experience with scripts. Combine the passion people have for extensions and the ability to sync those extensions across multiple computers and portable installations, and you've got a force to be contended with. [Download Firefox]

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Opera
(Available free for Windows/Mac/Linux):

Opera is a rock-solid browser with roots stretching back to 1994. Many of the features baked right into Opera are either not implemented in other browsers, or require multiple extensions at the cost of system resources - navigation by mouse gestures is one of the flashier examples. Despite being feature-packed, Opera has a fairly small market share, due largely in part to being trialware up until 2000 and advertisement-supported until 2005 - many people were turned off by the expense, if not the ads. Still, Opera proponents have long claimed that Opera beats Internet Explorer and Firefox when it comes to speedy rendering. Another selling point for Opera is the quality of the built-in tools. For many users, the built-in RSS reader, email client, and BitTorrent client do their jobs admirably, cutting down on the number applications they need running at once. Opera is extensible, but the pool of available extensions is radically smaller than that available for Firefox. [Download Opera]

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Safari
(Available free for Windows/Mac):

Currently in version 5, Safari is Apple's contribution to the web browsing world, and originally built to fit snugly inside OS X. Like Chrome, Safari runs the speedy WebKit rendering engine for snappy page loads. In addition to its WebKit core, Safari also has the Nitro JavaScript engine, which lays claim to radically faster JavaScript execution than Internet Explorer and Firefox (in its own testing reports, anyway), but this is a constantly shifting scene involving lopping off a few milliseconds here and there. Safari sports Apple's Cover Flow browser for perusing your history and bookmarks and an eye-catching display of the top 24 sites you've visited as the default page when Safari is loaded. There is a also a 'Safari Reader' which condenses web pages to easy to read and print versions. It's a good solid browser. [Download Safari]

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Internet Explorer
(Available free for Windows only):

Internet Explorer still commands a healthy chunk of the browser market, mostly because it ships with the most popular operating system on Earth and fits, if not exactly elegantly, into many corporate computer plans. While many or most IE users stick with it for lack of wanting to try something else, we definitely don't fall into that crowd. The majority of people who use Internet Explorer are sporting Internet Explorer 8. By contrast, nearly 20 percent of those surfing the web were using Internet Explorer 6 in 2009, although this is now down to single figure percentages. Internet Explorer 6 had its initial release way back in 2001. Version 8 marked a welcome change – it was the first version of Internet Explorer to have a stronger focus on web standards compliance, as well as increasing rendering speed. And like Chrome, Internet Explorer 8 maintained a separate process for each tab to increase stability and security. Internet Explorer 8 was also beefed up in security measures compared with previous versions (which were poor), including active filtering against malicious cross-site scripting and ActiveX isolation from the core of the browser.

Internet Explorer 9 has just been released, and promises to further expand on web standards compliance and contain better support for html5 and CSS3. About time! So, if you are still running an older version of Explorer, please update it and... [please use this link to upgrade Explorer.]

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Apart from running software that detects and deals with malware, several other steps can be taken to aid computer security, irrespective of platform.

Firewalls...

A firewall is like a set of gates manned by security personnel. Authorised traffic is allowed in and out of a network, with unauthorised traffic being blocked. They can either be hardware – built into an ADSL router for example, or software – Windows and Mac OS X (the Mac operating system) have them built in.

It is important to check that firewalls are operating. This is equally true for individual domestic users as for corporate users. If your ADSL router has a functioning firewall that is operating correctly, then it’s debatable whether the software firewall will add anything above this. Usually it doesn’t. It does become important if you are connecting from a public service network at an airport or hotel for example. In this case it should be on. In any case, it won’t do any harm having it on.

The Mac OS X software firewall is off by default, as Mac OS X allows only a handful of common services to connect – i.e. let in traffic – in it’s default configuration. I’d still turn it on, and enable stealth mode where appropriate. Stealth mode prevents any response to an ‘is anyone there’ request.

For more information on setting up the inbuilt Windows firewall, see here:
(For XP) http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/security/winfirewall.mspx(For Vista) http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-vista/features/firewall.aspx

ZoneAlarm have a Windows firewall package available here:
http://www.zonealarm.com/security/en-gb/home.htm?lid=en-gb
It is far more comprehensive in it’s reporting and configuration than Windows Firewall, and a free version is available.

For more information about setting up the in-built Mac OS X firewall, see here:
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1810

A third party and highly configurable firewall for Mac OS X is available here, named WaterRoof:
http://www.hanynet.com/waterroof/
It’s free and a simpler cut-down version named NoobProof is also available, which may be preferable to the new user.

Accounts and Passwords...

Don’t run your computer with more privileges than necessary. In other words, don’t run as an Administrator, when a basic User account will do. This can be problematic on Windows, with some applications requiring Administrator rights to work properly. This doesn’t follow Microsoft’s guidelines, and is the fault of the application manufacturer, but the situation is getting better over time.

Give your account a proper password. qwerty123 is NOT secure. Something like daeUAGyhVrTx is better, with wUcp:R6|EV[W being better still. My online banking password is 20 characters long and contains a mixture of upper and lower case letters, and numerals. How do I remember it? That would be telling.

I also have separate passwords for every website requiring them. It is possible to devise a system for easily remembering them, but I can’t give my system away now can I?

Updates and Patches...

Generally speaking, it is a good idea to let the operating system automatically install updates and patches. This is not always applicable in a corporate environment, where updates and patches may need testing for unwanted side-effects first. Occasionally updates and patches do more harm than good, introducing an unforeseen problem as well as fixing the original one for example. This pattern sometimes extends to updating whole operating systems, but that’s another story!

A few notes about web

Choosing a browser to use is not necessarily straightforward. On the Windows platform the choice is usually made for you. Internet Explorer, or IE.

Internet Explorer has had a poor record with security. This is due to several reasons, perhaps the most damning being the way it is tied to the operating system via something called ActiveX. This allows web sites to control aspects of the host computer via the browser, the idea being to increase functionality. There are two main problems.

  1. ActiveX is not a standard recognised by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), and is proprietary to Microsoft. Anyone using anything other than Internet Explorer will not get any added functionality without workarounds, and the use of Windows on the client is mandatory. This in not acceptable for today’s more open internet.
     
  2. ActiveX has been fundamental in allowing the security of Internet Explorer to be compromised on numerous occasions. Because it is possible to write ActiveX controls that can effectively install and run software on a client’s machine, it provides a powerful method of compromising a machine once the security surrounding ActiveX is breached. This has proved all too easy in the past.

Internet Explorer is also behind the times in keeping up with web standards agreed by the W3C, and many of the standards that is does follow, are interpreted incorrectly, resulting in web pages being rendered in unintended ways. This makes life for web developers particularly awkward, as one website design doesn’t work on all browsers. IE6 is especially poor in this regard. IE7 is a step up, but is still behind the times in keeping up with standards. IE8, still in beta form at the time of writing, is a step up, as it follows the W3C guidelines more closely, but is still slightly backward. If you are using IE6, I’d strongly advise updating to a modern browser.

On the Mac side, Safari is the default installed browser. It has had one or two security problems, with Apple being a little slow to provide updates for known problems on occasion. It is generally rather more secure than IE though. It is a standards based browser, and will generally render web pages completely as intended. Safari is also available for Windows. Safari 5 is taking the uptake of web standards a step further than most, and renders pages very rapidly as well. To download the latest version of Safari please click here:http://www.apple.com/uk/safari/

For a web standards browser, Firefox is a very sound choice. It is cross platform, and is extendible via a vast series of ‘Add-ons’. These extend the capabilities of Firefox, including add-ons for spotting sites infected with malware, for rejecting web adverts etc. It has a good record in security terms.
http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/all.html – There is a British English version available here.

Another new, but already credible browser is Google’s Chrome. It excels in the security it deploys, with the browser running in a ‘sandbox’ - code cannot be run outside of the limits imposed by the browser. This means that plug-ins run in their own area, html and javascript run in their own area and so on, with each area walled off from others, as well as system processes. So far, Chrome is looking like the most secure browser available.

To download both Windows and Mac versions click here: http://www.google.com/chrome

 

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Creative design is central to all we do. Our experience in all areas of communication means we have produced effective concepts and executions for many clients and industries. Our creative process covers our full range of services, from brand creation and management, starting with the logo design and corporate identity, brochures, vehicle liveries, signage to web design and e-marketing, advertising, product visualisation, on-screen presentations and video production. We provide copywriting, creative photography, artwork, printing and a delivery service.

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Whether you want to sit down and discuss how a promotional strategy fits into your existing marketing plan or you want to draw up a strategy from scratch, we can help. Our marketing services include, Marketing Strategy, Marketing Plans, Market Research, Product Planning & Selection, New Product Development and Customer Relationship Management.

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Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is now central to every company’s marketing and promotional strategy. We offer clients the full package including, Hosting, Website Design, Maintenance, Site Redevelopment and e-Marketing. We can also provide you with bespoke elements for Financial & Database Integration and Intranet Development.

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Professional photography can turn a great design into a truely oustanding one. The Combination of design, marketing and photography can take your product or service to a totally new level, leaving the competition looking decidedly weak. We work closely with the best photographers, providing photographic shoot lists, art direction and the organisiation required to get the perfect balance of creativity and impact for your product or services.

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Presentations are match winners, whether it's a must win contract or assisting your sales teams effectiveness . These really help separate you from your competitors... when standing out and being remembered is a must. We can plan, copywrite and design your perfect presentation and it's packaging. There are several types of delivery method depending on how your final presentation is to be viewed, choose from Powerpoint, Keynote, DVD or Online Movie, the choice is yours.

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For clients who spend money above-the-line we can offer a full in-house media buying, creative execution and delivery service. Our advertising service includes Media Planning, Media Consultancy and Media Buying, Production and Delivery.

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Whatever your event(s), private or public, we have extensive in-house experience of Event Management and Exhibition stand building. We can handle the whole project from booking to on-the-day staffing. Or you may want us to handle just one part of it e.g. stand building. Events can be small one-off affairs or major roadshows and venues. We provide exhibition services in the UK and overseas working with clients own teams or handing over completed, finished exhibition stands.

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Our Public Relations service is offered to clients as part of our overall package. We have a tremendous track record of success and work with all the regional and national media. If we do not already have the necessary contacts we have extensive databases of publications and names of editorial staff. We also have a network of local photographers across the UK who can attend events etc

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There are a number of services we offer that do not fall into the other categories. For instance, Sales Promotions, we can source and put together premiums, incentive packages and promotions to complement other initiatives in a marketing strategy. We also offer Enquiry Handling and fulfilment. Whether you need telephone follow-up, campaign handling or literature distribution, we can assist you. Services are provided internally or with our partner companies, allowing us to manage your total campaign.

Communique - Creative Design | Marketing | Web

Communique, 74 Lairgate, Beverley, East Yorkshire, HU17 8EU
T: 01482 863635 F: 01482 873358

© Communique 2010

Client Resources

Client Resources...

Design, Internet and Marketing hints, tips and more...

Design, Print and Internet Terms A to Z

How to set-up an email account on your windows PC (Personal Computer)

How to set-up an email account on your MAC (in Mac Mail)

Top 5 Internet Browser's for the Windows PC and MAC

General Computer Security

Creative Graphic Design

Marketing Consultancy

Web Design and e-Marketing

Creative and Commercial Photography

On-Screen and Video Presentations

Advertising Design

Exhibition and Events Design and Organisation

PR

Other Services - Sales Promotions

What We Do